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  • The cosmos is full of incredible things

    What did you discover today?

    • Imagine you’re at the petrol station filling up your car, when a splash of petrol hits the ground.  The last time these atoms saw the Sun was 300 million years ago, when the world crawled with millipedes over 8 feet in length and dragonflies flew with 30 inch wingspans through a vast global swampland.

    • referral-bonusThe Most Cost-Effective Climate Solution Available: Keep Forests Where They Are

      Extending this safeguard to all of our carbon rich old-growth forests nationwide will be crucial.
      Protecting carbon sinks like the Amazon and the Tongass is the largest, most cost effective, natural climate solution available.
      To mitigate the impending climate and biodiversity crisis, the conservation of mature and old-growth public forests must be a central component of our nation’s climate strategy.
      The United States Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management should establish permanent protections for mature and old growth federal forests and trees nationwide.
      It will be one of the most cost-effective and powerful near-term climate solutions the United States can employ.

      Link to article

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      reddit🔥 anemone fleeing from starfish 🔥

      Posted by coonshooter in r/NatureIsFuckingLit

    • An immense field appears to be covered with snow, blanketed in white. But a closer look reveals more than 10,000 Snow Geese. Snow Geese nest on Wrangel Island, in the Chukchi Sea off northern Siberia. Don’t miss the amazing video by Barbara Galatti! Learn more at BirdNote.org.

    • Our obligation to survive and flourish is owed not just to ourselves, but also to the Cosmos, ancient and vast, from which we spring.
      ~ Carl Sagan (Cosmos: A Personal Voyage, 1990 Update)

    • Our task is not just to train more scientists but also to deepen public understanding of science.
      ~ Carl Sagan (“Why We Need To Understand Science” in The Skeptical Inquirer Vol. 14, Issue 3, Spring 1990)

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